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my book is availeable at amazon:

📕| “What does running have to do with sickness, health, and recovery from an evolutionary standpoint? Where does this incredible, universal healing effect running has come from? (But not just running, any sport that requires prolonged, strenuous activity.) When cavemen chased the wild animal until it died of exhaustion, pain-relieving and rewarding hormones were released in their bodies that served to make them even more tenacious. It could not have been any other way, because survival was at stake. There were two options: one was that you succeeded in killing the prey by chasing it until it died of exhaustion, and then the reward was the obtained sustenance. The other possibility was a failure, but this was not the absence of reward either: the action itself, running, was also rewarded by the brain. The instinct to want to live is stronger than anything else. It was a kind of evolutionary imperative for the hunter-gatherer prehistoric human to never give up, never tire, but to chase their prey for as long as necessary. For millions of years hunting, that is ultra-long-distance running meant survival as it was done in the interest of obtaining food.”

– Believe, Live, Run – A story about having faith Bertalan Thuróczy

📕| “We have already discussed the evolutionary advantage of our ability to perspire. But you need more than that for long-distance running: appropriate bone structure and muscles, as well as the hormonal processes that happen during this prolonged physical activity, the production of endorphin, serotonin, noradrenaline, among others. These hormonal changes play a key role in physical and mental recovery. Of course, we all know the benefits of running on our physical health: stronger heart pump function, better circulation, more flexible blood vessel walls, better lung capacity, stronger muscles and bones, more lean muscles, smaller body fat percentage, less visceral fat and so on. We humans did not become tenacious and persevering, and thus for example long-distance runners so that our body could provide us with reward hormones, it is quite the opposite, the reward is there to ensure our endurance. The more we experience the phenomenon, the more we want to again: it is almost an addiction. Think about it, how many of us start running only to find that in a few days or weeks, exercise is more important than going out on the weekends or relaxing? This is because the hormones produced during flow (such as dopamine) give us such a reward that there are few activities we enjoy more than running once we have gotten into it. Everyone can experience flow, but we have to persevere long enough for it to kick in. Just as our ancestors did during the hunt. ” – Believe, Live, Run – A story about having faith Bertalan Thuróczy

my book is availeable at amazon:

📕| “In summary, this several-thousand-year process during which our body was optimized for running was sparked by man’s evolutionary need to adapt to our environment, and this ability for adaptation is what made us suitable for life itself. The opportunity for movement meant the opportunity for life. This is how we obtained food or were able to flee when necessary. During the process, our bodies were our biochemists: they began producing substances and hormones that aided the abilities necessary for survival. Why was all this of key importance for our development and survival? And what significance does this have in our modern world? To answer these questions I am going to go back even further and answer how our ancestors were able to hunt and thus eat meat even before they invented the first stone tool. The answer is simple (while the activity itself is far from it): they chased the prey to death, literally. Meaning that if our ancestors discovered the tracks of a prey animal, then they pursued it, ran after it, and chased the animal until it died of heat exhaustion. This is because the human body has a superpower that has not developed to such efficiency in any other animal: the ability to produce increased perspiration. This, among other factors, is what makes us the best long-distance runners in the world. This is one of the reasons why we are capable of withstanding physical activity better than any other animal, for example running, fleeing. Of course, over short distances, we are slow, weak, and vulnerable. We have many disadvantages compared to other animals, but still, we are the apex predators of the animal kingdom. ”

– Believe, Live, Run – A story about having faith Bertalan Thuróczy

📕| “In today’s world, we no longer have the evolutionary pressure to be persistent. We do not have to run after our supper, we simply go into a shop and purchase the ‘prey’ that has been pre-hunted for us. There is no problem with this, after all, we are modern, civilized people. The real issue is that our body, after millions of years of evolution, cannot keep up with the diet and lifestyle changes we have undergone in the short past few hundred years or even just decades. Adaptation affecting our genetics takes a very long time: it can be several generations before the process is initiated. Furthermore, our tendency and capacity for perseverance have been put on the backburner as well. We no longer have to hunt, carry out a prolonged physical activity which leads to self-rewarding hormonal changes in the body by which our system encourages us to keep going. Today, we have to make a conscious effort to practice such activities. Naturally, I don’t mean hunting, but rather prolonged physical exercise, like long-distance running, yoga, walking, swimming, or any other sport or physical activity. The evolutionary process described above made it possible for the human race to survive. 23 That is how important running was even back then. And we hold this legacy in our genes to this day, it is simply that our modern environment is at odds with these qualities. The good news though is that we can take steps to get closer to nature, to become more comfortable with exercise, and thus bring ourselves closer to healing and living. ” – Believe, Live, Run – A story about having faith Bertalan Thuróczy

my book is availeable at amazon:

📕| “We are all born to run. It is only civilization and the modern era that has gotten us off this track. Our ancestors were all ‘long-distance runners and ‘endurance athletes, only it wasn’t called that. More precisely, back then, the aim of movement was different from what it is today; it was to stay alive, to hunt, to eat. Throughout millions of years, the human body evolved for this. I am not saying we should start hunting again and chasing our prey over kilometers, but we should at least change our lifestyles so that our bodies serve the purpose they were built for, what they have been optimized for over millions of years of evolution: every human being was born to run or at least to move.  

– Believe, Live, Run – A story about having faith Bertalan Thuróczy

 

 

📕| “The flow-experience while running is likely due to the exercise-induced transient hypofrontality. At these times, we forget ourselves, the passing of time, our self-criticism, even our sense of pain decreases. This is why it is possible to run faster on a long-distance than we ever thought we could when in a state of flow. We are hardly aware of what is going on around us in such a state, like when doing a half-marathon or a full marathon. That’s why running “doesn’t hurt as much” or rather we do not feel it. Any runner feels the flow in these situations: it’s like the world around you has ceased to exist, you hardly perceive your surroundings, your sense of time is gone. This phenomenon is based on the fact that when we are engaged in heavy physical activity, our motor functions (those responsible for movement) take up much of our brain capacity and so our brain is largely focused on carrying out the movements properly. Due to the brain’s finite capacity for metabolism, it compensates for the increased activity by decreasing the function of other areas that are not in use at the moment. Meaning the blood supply is redistributed due to the physical activity as the cerebral cortex responsible for movement requires more energy. This happens throughout the entirety of the body: the muscles need the most oxygen and nutrient-rich blood, so this is sent to the muscles that are doing the heightened activity. So running can cause exercised induced transient hypofrontality, but it is important to note that now it is a hypothesis. – Believe, Live, Run – A story about having faith Bertalan Thuróczy

my book is availeable at amazon: